Jewish Studies at Hofstra

Click here for information on the B.A. in Jewish Stuides and here for the minor

The Comparative Literature and Languages Department includes a Hebrew Language and Literature Program

Courses in Jewish Studies are offered through the Religion Department

  

Hebrew (HEBR) Courses

HEBR 001 - Elementary Hebrew:  Fundamentals of grammar and pronunciation. Simple conversational patterns.

HEBR 001Q - Biblical Hebrew 1: Introduction to biblical Hebrew and northwest Semitic Hebrew consisting of  the examination of the alphabet, grammar, and syntax of  of the sacred language.  Attention is paid to the historical development and evolution of Hebrew in the pre- and post-exilic periods. 

HEBR 002 - Elementary Hebrew: Continuation of 1. Selected readings.

HEBR 002Q - Biblical Hebrew: Continuation of 1Q.

HEBR 003 - Intermediate Hebrew: Review of grammar. Reading and translation of prose of average difficulty.

HEBR 004 - Intermediate Hebrew: Readings of selected materials and vocalized texts.

HEBR 101 - Hebrew Language and Literature: HEBR (101-104 and 151-153) are an integrated sequence of courses emphasizing both advanced language skills and literature. This sequence aims at gradually developing the students proficiency in oral expression, composition (including grammar and syntax) and reading. The individual students needs, interests and prior experience determine the exact nature, pace and contents of each course. A detailed personal record is maintained to assure the development of each students skills. 

HEBR 102 - Hebrew Language and Literature: HEBR (101-104 and 151-153) are an integrated sequence of courses emphasizing both advanced language skills and literature. This sequence aims at gradually developing the students proficiency in oral expression, composition (including grammar and syntax) and reading. The individual students needs, interests and prior experience determine the exact nature, pace and contents of each course. A detailed personal record is maintained to assure the development of each students skills. 

HEBR 103 - Hebrew Language and Literature: HEBR (101-104 and 151-153) are an integrated sequence of courses emphasizing both advanced language skills and literature. This sequence aims at gradually developing the students proficiency in oral expression, composition (including grammar and syntax) and reading. The individual students needs, interests and prior experience determine the exact nature, pace and contents of each course. A detailed personal record is maintained to assure the development of each students skills.

HEBR 104 - Hebrew Language and Literature: HEBR (101-104 and 151-153) are an integrated sequence of courses emphasizing both advanced language skills and literature. This sequence aims at gradually developing the students proficiency in oral expression, composition (including grammar and syntax) and reading. The individual students needs, interests and prior experience determine the exact nature, pace and contents of each course. A detailed personal record is maintained to assure the development of each students skills. 

HEBR 112 - Hebrew Readings: Readings from masterpieces to keep alive the students interest in the language and literature. 

HEBR 113 - Hebrew Readings: Readings from masterpieces to keep alive the students interest in the language and literature. 

HEBR 114 - Hebrew Readings: Readings from masterpieces to keep alive the students interest in the language and literature. 

HEBR 115 - Hebrew Readings: Readings from masterpieces to keep alive the students interest in the language and literature. 

HEBR 116 - Hebrew Readings: Readings from masterpieces to keep alive the students interest in the language and literature.

HEBR 117 - Hebrew Readings: Readings from masterpieces to keep alive the students interest in the language and literature.

HEBR 118 - Hebrew Readings: Readings from masterpieces to keep alive the students interest in the language and literature.

HEBR 119 - Hebrew Readings: Readings from masterpieces to keep alive the students interest in the language and literature.

HEBR 151 - Hebrew Language and Literature: HEBR (101-104 and 151-153) are an integrated sequence of courses emphasizing both advanced language skills and literature. This sequence aims at gradually developing the students proficiency in oral expression, composition (including grammar and syntax) and reading. The individual students needs, interests and prior experience determine the exact nature, pace and contents of each course. A detailed personal record is maintained to assure the development of each students skills.

HEBR 152 - Hebrew Language and Literature: HEBR (101-104 and 151-153) are an integrated sequence of courses emphasizing both advanced language skills and literature. This sequence aims at gradually developing the students proficiency in oral expression, composition (including grammar and syntax) and reading. The individual students needs, interests and prior experience determine the exact nature, pace and contents of each course. A detailed personal record is maintained to assure the development of each students skills.

HEBR 153 - Hebrew Language and Literature: HEBR (101-104 and 151-153) are an integrated sequence of courses emphasizing both advanced language skills and literature. This sequence aims at gradually developing the students proficiency in oral expression, composition (including grammar and syntax) and reading. The individual students needs, interests and prior experience determine the exact nature, pace and contents of each course. A detailed personal record is maintained to assure the development of each students skills.

HEBR 199 - (LT) Seminar: Problems of Hebrew Studies: This course presupposes an extensive background in Hebraica/Judaica. The subject varies and depends on the special interest of the student.

 

Jewish Studies (JWST) Courses 

JWST 010R - (HP) The Bible: Ancient and Modern Perspectives: Various genres of biblical literature and teachings are studied against the background of contemporary Near Eastern civilizations and in light of the findings of modern biblical research and archaeology.

JWST 011R - (HP) Judaic Perspectives on the Hebrew Bible: An examination of Jewish Biblical interpretation from antiquity to the present with special focus on continuities and contrasts in exegetical method. Starting with an examination of inner biblical exegesis the course proceeds to scrutinize major forms of Jewish biblical interpretation from the period of the great Rabbinic sages in late antiquity, to Eastern centers of Medieval Jewish scholarship (e.g., Babylon, Islamic Spain), to the emergence of Western European forms of interpretation in the Renaissance to the period of Jewish Enlightenment, to the present. 

JWST 012S - First-Year Seminar: This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty members research interests. 

JWST 013R - (HP) The Bible and Its Interpretation Through the Ages: A comparative literary study of the various interpretations of the Bible with special reference to the Septuaginta, Aramaic Targumim and the commentaries that are based on the rabbinic tradition. 

JWST 014F - First-Year Seminar: This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty members research interests. 

JWST 014S - First-Year Seminar: This course gives first-year students the opportunity to work in a seminar format with a member of the faculty in an area of the faculty members research interests. 

JWST 015R - (HP) Judaism: Biblical and Rabbinic Origins: Introduction to the academic study of Jews and Judaism. Surveying early Jewish history in four broad periodsBiblical, 2nd Temple, Rabbinic, & early Medievalthe course provides an overview of both the origins of the Jewish people as well as the formation of the Jewish religious tradition. 

JWST 016R - (HP) Jews: From Medieval to Modern: The Jewish encounter with modernity in historical context, with special attention to key events of the 20th century: the establishment of the state of Israel, the European Holocaust, and the development of American Jewish culture and community. 

JWST 019R - (HP) Post-Biblical Writings: Selections from post-Biblical works in prose and poetry. Readings from medieval, philosophical, mystical and ethical writings with special reference to Judah Halevi and Maimonides. 

JWST 020 - (HP) The American Jewish Experience: This course provides a general introduction to American Jewish history, from the 1654 settlement of 23 Jews in New Amsterdam to the thriving community of todays United States, and explores major themes of the American Jewish experience such as immigration, acculturation, socioeconomic progress, political behavior, anti-Semitism, Zionism, community formation, and contributions to popular culture. Highlighting the evolution of Judaism in America, the course contextualizes the history of religious life within the broader range of social experience and cultural expression.  

JWST 036 - (HP) The Holocaust: Memory and Representation:  An introduction to Holocaust Studiesthe academic study of the mass destruction of European Jewry during World War IIincluding its history and aftermath, aesthetic representations and theoretical issues. The theme throughout will be the question of Holocaust memoryhow have the terrible events of the past entered our consciousness and shaped our culture today? 

JWST 048 - (IS) Israel: Myth and Reality: This course provides a general introduction to Israel studies, viewing the contemporary state of Israel through historical, political, sociological, religious, and cultural lenses. A small country attracting a great deal of attention, Israel functions both as an ordinary society and as a highly controversial symbol. In order to unpack the complex relationship between the myth and reality of Israel, the course begins with a history of its ancient and modern origins, then surveys contemporary Israeli politics and society, and concludes with an analysis of the meaning of Israel for Israelis, Palestinian Arabs, American Jews, and others around the world.  

JWST 055 - (HP) Judaism and Islam: Jews and Arabs:  Dynamics of the relationship between Islam and Judaism. Arab- Israeli conflict viewed against the multidimensional aspect of the Jewish existence in the Middle East. 

JWST 060 - (IS) The Comedy of Difference: Jewish Humor in America:  This course provides an interdisciplinary and multimedia look at a popular American art formJewish humor. Like all comedy, the Jewish variety deals with the central themes of the human experience: family, love, sex, religion, politics, prejudice, identity, and other cultural normsall premised upon the divisions and diversity characteristic of American society. At the same time, Jewish humor is a central element of modern Jewish culture, and its study sheds light on contemporary Jewish experience as well.  

JWST 100 - Honors Essay: Research and writing of a substantial essay in the field of Jewish Studies.

JWST 101 A-Z - (HP) Special Topics in Jewish Studies: Designed to treat special subjects or themes dealing with some major spiritual, political and social issues facing the Jewish people. The subject is chosen at the discretion of the department but with the students interest in view. Such themes as the dynamics of rabbinic Judaism; philosophy of ancient Israel; foundations of Jewish mysticism, etc., are considered. 

JWST 107R - (HP) Women in the Hebrew Bible: A literary analysis of the many representations of women found in the Hebrew Bible. Through a close reading of biblical literature and in dialogue with various forms of feminist scholarship, this course examines issues such as patriarchy and its relation to the production of Old Testament literature; gender relations; goddess worship; violence against women; the political, legal, economic and religious standing of ancient Israelite women.

JWST 108R - (HP) Modern Jewish Intellectuals: An examination of major Jewish intellectuals from the period of the Jewish Enlightenment (ca. late 18th century) to the present. An initial inquiry as to the definition of the term intellectual leads us to the larger question of the Jewish intellectual and his or her relation to the Jewish and non-Jewish world. Among the figures to be read are Karl Marx, Theodor Herzl, Emile Durkheim, Franz Kafka, Georg Simmel, Sigmund Freud, Anzia Yezierska, Rosa Luxemburg, Simone Weil, George Steiner, Hannah Arendt, Philip Roth, Amos Oz, Cynthia Ozick, and Saul Bellow.

JWST 119R - (HP) Blacks and Jews: Interrelation in the Diaspora: An examination of the relations between African-American and Jewish-Americans in the United States from the period of the Grand Alliance (ca., 1910-1967) to the current moment of crisis. Through the investigation of literature, sociological analysis, historical case studies, opinion pieces, and works of art, this course illuminates the complex and shifting relations between African-Americans and Jewish-Americans and their significance for questions of identity in the modern United States.

JWST 140R - (HP) Senior Seminar: Jewish Studies: Concentration on a particular topic of interest and small group discussions leading to a required essay on a topic chosen by the student.

JWST 156R - (HP) The Golden Age of Jewish Culture: Introduction to various genres of literature of the Jewish Golden Age in Spain. Readings from works of poetry, prose, ethics, philosophy, Jewish law and responsa. Emphasis on the writings of Saadya, Halevi, Idn Gabirol, Ibn Ezra, Maimonides and Karo. The historical development and its interplay with contemporary Arabic literature and Islamic civilization.

JWST 196 - Senior Essay: Research and writing of a substantial essay in the field of Jewish studies.

 

Other Departments' Course of Jewish Interest 

HIST 031 - Jewish History from the Patriarchal Period to the Age of Emancipation: Hebrew civilization in ancient and medieval times and its impact on the western world. An analysis of the socioeconomic and cultural development of the Babylonian, Spanish, Franco-German and Eastern European Jewish communities within the context of their contemporary societies.

HIST 105 - (HP) Ancient Egyptians, Hebrews and Greeks: Myth and religion, epic and tragedy, art and philosophy. Designed to provide an historical background for students of art, drama, literature, archaeology, philosophy or religion, as well as of history.

PHI 111 - Philosophy and the Holocaust: Philosophical perspectives on the Holocaust. The first half of the course examines what it means to represent the Holocaust, including epistemological and cultural issues about how to come to terms with the event. The second half of the course focuses upon understanding the Holocaust, especially ethical issues such as whether the Holocaust was a unique event; whether evil is a meaningful category to describe it; if so, how should one define this evil?; does the Holocaust reveal limitations in traditional and/or all moral theory?

LIT 020 - (LT) Modern Hebrew Literature: The period of Enlightenment (Haskalah): Hassidism, Hebrew Renaissance, contemporary essays, poetry, short stories, novels. Readings from the works of Bialik, Ahad Ha-am, Agnon and Hazaz.

LIT 024 - (LT) Israeli Literature: Fiction, essays, poetry, literary criticism.

LIT 026 - (LT) Yiddish Literature: Fiction, essays, poetry, literary criticism. Hassidic tales and humor.

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